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Free Practice 1
Free Practice 2
Free Practice 3
Qualifying
Race
Free Practice 1
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Free Practice 2
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Free Practice 3
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Qualifying
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Race
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The Circuit

What You Need To Know

The Monaco Grand Prix epitomises Formula 1 racing: heritage, glamour, passion and speed.

Alongside the Indianapolis 500 and Le Mans 24 Hours, it forms the ‘Triple Crown’ of motorsport.

One of just seven venues to host a round of the inaugural Formula 1 World Championship in 1950, Monte Carlo has been a permanent fixture on the calendar since 1955.

In that time the circuit has changed remarkably little. In 2003 a new, gentler entry to the Rascasse corner was formed. Further changes came in 2004 including a new pit complex and increased spectator capacity.

A combination of precision driving, technical excellence and sheer bravery is required to win in Monte Carlo, with some great names having ended their races in the Monaco walls.

The Fairmont hairpin is the slowest corner on the Formula 1 calendar, taken at just 48km/h (30 mph). The low speed corners on the track, in addition to the increased likelihood of a safety car interruption means Monaco is the only Grand Prix which does not run to the standard F1 race distance of 305km.

Fact File: Monaco Grand Prix

  • Clocking in at just 3.337 km in length, the Circuit de Monaco is the shortest track on the current F1 calendar. The next shortest circuit we visit is Zandvoort, which is nearly a full kilometre longer at 4.259 km.

  • The race sees the highest lap count of any event with 78 tours of the circuit forming the Monaco Grand Prix. It is the only race that does not adhere to the FIA's mandated 305 km minimum distance, measuring 260.286 km.

  • It also has the shortest run from pole position to the braking zone for the first corner, measuring just 114 metres.

  • Just 34% of the lap is spent at full throttle. That is significantly lower than the 43% of the lap at the Autodromo Hermanos Rodriguez in Mexico that is spent at full throttle, the next lowest total on the calendar.

  • Taken at just 45 km/h, the hairpin at turn six is the slowest corner F1 cars negotiate across the season. Being the tightest 180° corner on the calendar, special steering racks are used that allow for more steering angle.

  • With three victories around the streets of the principality, Lewis is the most successful driver on the current grid at the Monaco Grand Prix. Fernando Alonso and Max Verstappen have taken two wins, whilst Sergio Perez has claimed one apiece.

  • From the seven races in F1's inaugural 1950 season, only four of them remain on the calendar in 2023: the British, Monaco, Belgian and Italian Grands Prix. All four races take place on the same circuits they did in 1950: Silverstone, Circuit de Monaco, Spa-Francorchamps, and Monza.

  • The first-ever Monaco Grand Prix was organised in 1929 by Antony Noghès. The final corner of the circuit is named in his honour.

In 2012, Michael Schumacher famously produced a sensational lap around the streets to top the qualifying timesheets in his W03.

Our most recent success in the Principality came in 2019, when Lewis Hamilton claimed an emotionally charged victory just days after the passing of our friend and non-executive chairman Niki Lauda.

  • First GP
    1950
  • Circuit Length
    3.337km